Fuck Yeah Solar System!
"This kind of abundance can't be produced by anything but a supernova."

This blog is all about our celestial neighborhood.
I hope our solar system inspires you the way it continually inspires me.
  • therecipe

Scientist Offers Mushy New Theory About The Moon

propagandery:

Where in the Solar System Has Voyager 1 Wound Up?
NASA confirmed Thursday that the Voyager 1 probe, launched 36 years ago, has achieved a milestone beyond any other man-made object. In August 2012, it broke free of the bonds of the sun and its dainty solar wind in a magnetic cage — its heliosphere — and now travels in the interstellar medium, where high-energy particles dart hither and yon. This is astonishing and marvelous.
But, no, it has not left the solar system — by at least one definition that’s easy to support. Despite every headline you’ve read! Despite the fact that you may believe NASA has announced and retracted it leaving the solar system over and over again. (Which is hasn’t, either. Thursday was the first time the NASA and JPL scientists concurred with outside researchers that the previously conceived-of model was incorrect, and it’s gone beyond a critical point.)
BoingBoing

propagandery:

Where in the Solar System Has Voyager 1 Wound Up?

NASA confirmed Thursday that the Voyager 1 probe, launched 36 years ago, has achieved a milestone beyond any other man-made object. In August 2012, it broke free of the bonds of the sun and its dainty solar wind in a magnetic cage — its heliosphere — and now travels in the interstellar medium, where high-energy particles dart hither and yon. This is astonishing and marvelous.

But, no, it has not left the solar system — by at least one definition that’s easy to support. Despite every headline you’ve read! Despite the fact that you may believe NASA has announced and retracted it leaving the solar system over and over again. (Which is hasn’t, either. Thursday was the first time the NASA and JPL scientists concurred with outside researchers that the previously conceived-of model was incorrect, and it’s gone beyond a critical point.)

BoingBoing

Boldly Going ... Going ... Gone! Why Voyager 1's Entrance Into Interstellar Space Is Such a Big Deal

theatlantic:

The sun's magnetic field is about to flip

phroyd:

"It looks like we’re no more than three to four months away from a complete field reversal," said solar physicist Todd Hoeksema of Stanford University. "This change will have ripple effects throughout the solar system." 

The sun’s magnetic field changes polarity approximately every 11 years. It happens at the peak of each solar cycle as the sun’s inner magnetic dynamo re-organizes itself. The coming reversal will mark the midpoint of Solar Cycle 24. Half of “solar max” will be behind us, with half yet to come.

Hoeksema is the director of Stanford’s Wilcox Solar Observatory, one of the few observatories in the world that monitors the sun’s polar magnetic fields. The poles are a herald of change. Just as Earth scientists watch our planet’s polar regions for signs of climate change, solar physicists do the same thing for the sun. Magnetograms at Wilcox have been tracking the sun’s polar magnetism since 1976, and they have recorded three grand reversals — with a fourth in the offing.

i—-i:

we-are-star-stuff:

the-science-llama:

Everything You Need To Know About The Perseid Meteor Shower

The Perseid Meteor Shower is one of the most reliable and best meteor showers of the year alongside the other giant, the Geminid meteor shower in December. The Perseids usually peak each year in August but will be visible even as early as mid-July. This is definitely something you don’t want to miss.

Peak Rate
Between August 10-13 expect a rate of around 80 meteors/hour provided you have a dark sky. Perseids will be visible (though fewer) even in mid/late July as it builds up. The Perseid shower will combine with the Delta Aquarids as well, which peak around July 28 but are active until early August. The Delta Aquarids are less spectacular than the Perseids and this year the Moon will be brightening up the sky during their peak, but you may still see a few around that time. The Delta Aquarids radiant point (Aquaris constellation) allows for a better show in the Southern Hemisphere.

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(Perseid meteor in 2011 as seen from the ISS, taken by Ron Garan)

— Light Pollution
To ensure you see the most meteors possible, go somewhere away from city lights and get atop a mountain if there is one near you, as this will minimize light pollution. The light pollution from a city (or the moon!) will drown out fainter meteors, so best to avoid that. As you can see in the second image here, light pollution lowers the amount of stars you can see in the sky AND the meteors/hour rate. Have you ever seen the Milky Way with your own eyes? It’s amazing, you should definitely try to find some dark sky to view it. In some places it’s bright enough to cast shadows!

Thankfully the moon sets in the afternoon, before midnight, during the time of the peak so it won’t ruin the show. It is only a crescent (about 17% illuminated) on the night of the 10th but will be around 45% illuminated on the 13th and set later in the day then as well. Once the moon sets, typically the best time to watch will be the hours just before sunrise, though it should be a good show all throughout the night either way. Now we can only hope to have clear skies.
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Radiant Point
Meteors will appear all across the sky (so don’t restrict yourself to looking at just the Perseus constellation), however they will seem to radiate from the Perseus constellation, meaning their tails will point back towards it. Just lay back and scan the sky, and when your eyes adjust to the darkness you will be able to see more.

Perseus rises in the Northeast, located near the Pleiades star cluster and the “W” shaped Cassiopeia. [See the radiant point as seen from the Western and Eastern US]. (Images made using Stellarium)
image

More meteors will be visible when the Radiant point is higher in the sky, because when the radiant is low only meteors traveling at the correct angle will be visible as there is more atmosphere for it and the light to travel through making them further away and also more dim. When it is higher, the meteors are traveling through less atmosphere, scattering the light less, making them brighter. Also more of the sky is scooping up comet-dust, increasing the rate.

The illustration below makes it seem as though some parts of the world might not see the shower but the only thing you have to worry about is your latitude because the comet debris field is large enough for Earth to spend a few weeks traveling through.

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— Visibility
The radiant location also means the Southern Hemisphere will see lower rates. Areas below -32 degrees latitude will see very few to none because the radiant point never rises above the horizon. I recommend taking a drive north if you live close to or below that latitude. [Full Size]

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Something to note, when the radiant point is near the horizon you will see less meteors - as was mentioned before - but you will also have a chance to see more Earthgrazers. These are long-lasting meteors that cut across Earth’s atmosphere at a less steep angle leaving long tails behind them [like this one in 1972]. They can be quite spectacular and if the space rock is large enough it could even pass through Earth’s atmosphere and back out into space!

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Notes

The background art for the first image before editing was made by Mark A. Garlick // Space-Art

Dark Sky Finder // Help map global light pollution

Rate Estimator (Fluxtimator) // Meteor Counter App for NASA Research

Stellarium or Planetarium

Just sit back, find somewhere dark, take in the majesty of the cosmos and ride spaceship Earth through the debris field of comet Swift-Tuttle at ~107,000kmh. Be sure to bundle up, stay warm and remember; you might see a lot or you might not see many, but if you stay in the house, you won’t see any.

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Do you see that black dot on the map? That’s where I live. IN THE ASS OF THE WORLD

I hope all of you have fun! (and please take a lot of pictures)

discoverynews:

Pluto’s New Moons Get Names From Hell
Congratulations Pluto! We Earthlings have named two of your offspring Kerberos and Styx. You may have noticed that, in keeping with your Hellish roots, we’ve named your cute little bundles of rock after deities of the Underworld. What’s that? You’d rather one be named after a science fiction planet?! And Captain Kirk gave you his blessing?! Tough.

discoverynews:

Pluto’s New Moons Get Names From Hell

Congratulations Pluto! We Earthlings have named two of your offspring Kerberos and Styx. You may have noticed that, in keeping with your Hellish roots, we’ve named your cute little bundles of rock after deities of the Underworld. What’s that? You’d rather one be named after a science fiction planet?! And Captain Kirk gave you his blessing?! Tough.

It All Began in Chaos

discoverynews:

Voyager Reaches Mystery Interstellar Doorstep
Voyager’s prolonged journey into interstellar space took another dramatic turn when the intrepid space probe last summer passed into a bizarre and unanticipated cosmic hallway between the bubble of space under the sun’s influence and whatever lies beyond. Read more

discoverynews:

Voyager Reaches Mystery Interstellar Doorstep

Voyager’s prolonged journey into interstellar space took another dramatic turn when the intrepid space probe last summer passed into a bizarre and unanticipated cosmic hallway between the bubble of space under the sun’s influence and whatever lies beyond. Read more

latimes:

Brace yourself for another asteroid flyby
To quote science reporter Deborah Netburn:

It’s 1.7 miles long. Its surface is covered in a sticky black substance similar to the gunk at the bottom of a barbecue. If it impacted Earth it would probably result in global extinction. Good thing it is just making a flyby.

At approximately 1:59 p.m. PDT May 31, Asteroid 1998 QE2 will make a close (by galactic standards) pass by our home planet. Coming within just 3.6 million miles of Earth, the asteroid will be so close that many of its features will be visible on radar.
For more details on the asteroid, including its possible origin, at Science Now.
Photo: NASA / JPL / Caltech

latimes:

Brace yourself for another asteroid flyby

To quote science reporter Deborah Netburn:

It’s 1.7 miles long. Its surface is covered in a sticky black substance similar to the gunk at the bottom of a barbecue. If it impacted Earth it would probably result in global extinction. Good thing it is just making a flyby.

At approximately 1:59 p.m. PDT May 31, Asteroid 1998 QE2 will make a close (by galactic standards) pass by our home planet. Coming within just 3.6 million miles of Earth, the asteroid will be so close that many of its features will be visible on radar.

For more details on the asteroid, including its possible origin, at Science Now.

Photo: NASA / JPL / Caltech