Fuck Yeah Solar System!
"This kind of abundance can't be produced by anything but a supernova."

This blog is all about our celestial neighborhood.
I hope our solar system inspires you the way it continually inspires me.
  • therecipe
Saturn has many moons (62!) and this photo, taken by the amazing Cassini, is of the moon Enceladus. Enceladus can be seen spewing ice and other gases into space. This process is known as cryovolcanism. Scientists believe that Enceladus has only been active 1-20% of its existence so we are extremely lucky that Cassini was able to catch this image.

Saturn has many moons (62!) and this photo, taken by the amazing Cassini, is of the moon Enceladus. Enceladus can be seen spewing ice and other gases into space. This process is known as cryovolcanism. Scientists believe that Enceladus has only been active 1-20% of its existence so we are extremely lucky that Cassini was able to catch this image.

bonedust:

canisfamiliaris:

Most Detailed Photo of a Sunspot Ever
Like the centre of a flower or a mysterious eye, this is the most detailed image of a sunspot ever captured using visible light. The stunning picture of the huge 8,000 mile-diameter sunspot (the dark part at the center of the photo) was taken using the Big Bear Telescope in California. At the center of the sunspot the temperature is around 3,600C, while the surrounding regions are hotter than 5,800C. The irregular shapes that surround the sunspot are known as granulations, made of hot gases from inside the Sun, each of which is around 1000km in size.

bonedust:

canisfamiliaris:

Most Detailed Photo of a Sunspot Ever

Like the centre of a flower or a mysterious eye, this is the most detailed image of a sunspot ever captured using visible light. The stunning picture of the huge 8,000 mile-diameter sunspot (the dark part at the center of the photo) was taken using the Big Bear Telescope in California. At the center of the sunspot the temperature is around 3,600C, while the surrounding regions are hotter than 5,800C. The irregular shapes that surround the sunspot are known as granulations, made of hot gases from inside the Sun, each of which is around 1000km in size.

veganatalie:

This image taken by the Swedish Solar Telescope shows the photospheric granulation of the Sun. The granules are caused by hotter (brighter) columns of plasma rising between areas of cooler (darker) plasma. The tiny bright points located in the darker areas are caused by highly concentrated magnetic fields that create enough pressure to open up the surface and expose even hotter layers beneath the outer photosphere. The white bar represents 5,000 kilometers across the surface.(Via the Astronomy Picture of the Day)
I’ve seen a lot of this photo on the internet lately and I just had to post it because of its sheer beauty.

veganatalie:

This image taken by the Swedish Solar Telescope shows the photospheric granulation of the Sun. The granules are caused by hotter (brighter) columns of plasma rising between areas of cooler (darker) plasma. The tiny bright points located in the darker areas are caused by highly concentrated magnetic fields that create enough pressure to open up the surface and expose even hotter layers beneath the outer photosphere. The white bar represents 5,000 kilometers across the surface.
(Via the Astronomy Picture of the Day)

I’ve seen a lot of this photo on the internet lately and I just had to post it because of its sheer beauty.

itsfullofstars:

NASA Selects Science Investigations for Solar Probe Plus
WASHINGTON — NASA has begun development of a mission to visit and study the sun closer than ever before. The unprecedented project, named Solar Probe Plus, is slated to launch no later than 2018.
READ MORE

itsfullofstars:

NASA Selects Science Investigations for Solar Probe Plus

WASHINGTON — NASA has begun development of a mission to visit and study the sun closer than ever before. The unprecedented project, named Solar Probe Plus, is slated to launch no later than 2018.

READ MORE

That little dot in the lower center of the Sun?Planet MercuryThe larger darker spot on the left side is a sunspot.

That little dot in the lower center of the Sun?
Planet Mercury

The larger darker spot on the left side is a sunspot.

"This ominous, dark shape sprawling across the face of the Sun is a coronal hole - a low density region extending above the surface where the solar magnetic field opens freely into interplanetary space. During periods of low activity, coronal holes typically cover regions just above the Sun’s poles. But this extensive coronal hole dominated the Sun’s northern hemisphere earlier this week, captured here in extreme ultraviolet light by cameras onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory.”This did elicit auroral displays on our planet Earth

"This ominous, dark shape sprawling across the face of the Sun is a coronal hole - a low density region extending above the surface where the solar magnetic field opens freely into interplanetary space. During periods of low activity, coronal holes typically cover regions just above the Sun’s poles. But this extensive coronal hole dominated the Sun’s northern hemisphere earlier this week, captured here in extreme ultraviolet light by cameras onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory.”

This did elicit auroral displays on our planet Earth

(Source: http)

Most Extreme Magnet in the Solar System: our star, the Sun.This beautiful image shows our magnetically hyperactive Sun, ornamented with bright solar flares, arcs, and plasma streamers. The electrically charged plasma in the sun’s outer layers creates turbulent bubbles the size of Texas, which generate local magnetic fields. These magnetic field structures are often outlined by glowing plasma, because charged particles flow along magnetic field lines. That’s why bright filaments outline sunspots, which are regions where plasma is trapped by intense magnetic fields, and cools down. Where magnetic field lines cross, they can release tremendous bursts of energy known as solar flares and even larger blasts called coronal mass ejections (CMEs). A single CME can fling as much as 10 percent of the sun’s corona (its outer atmosphere) into space at intense speeds.

Most Extreme Magnet in the Solar System: our star, the Sun.

This beautiful image shows our magnetically hyperactive Sun, ornamented with bright solar flares, arcs, and plasma streamers. The electrically charged plasma in the sun’s outer layers creates turbulent bubbles the size of Texas, which generate local magnetic fields.

These magnetic field structures are often outlined by glowing plasma, because charged particles flow along magnetic field lines. That’s why bright filaments outline sunspots, which are regions where plasma is trapped by intense magnetic fields, and cools down. Where magnetic field lines cross, they can release tremendous bursts of energy known as solar flares and even larger blasts called coronal mass ejections (CMEs). A single CME can fling as much as 10 percent of the sun’s corona (its outer atmosphere) into space at intense speeds.

itsfullofstars:

Global Eruption Rocks the Sun

On August 1, 2010, an entire hemisphere of the sun erupted. Filaments of magnetism snapped and exploded, shock waves raced across the stellar surface, billion-ton clouds of hot gas billowed into space. Astronomers knew they had witnessed something big.

It was so big, it may have shattered old ideas about solar activity.

“The August 1st event really opened our eyes,” says Karel Schrijver of Lockheed Martin’s Solar and Astrophysics Lab in Palo Alto, CA. “We see that solar storms can be global events, playing out on scales we scarcely imagined before.”

For the past three months, Schrijver has been working with fellow Lockheed-Martin solar physicist Alan Title to understand what happened during the “Great Eruption.” They had plenty of data: The event was recorded in unprecedented detail by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and twin STEREO spacecraft. With several colleagues present to offer commentary, they outlined their findings at a press conference last Monday at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

Read more.

Solar System Visualiser

fuckyeahspace:

You can watch the planets, moons and asteroids of our solar system move in proportional time with this awesome visualiser. Set the date and speed, as well as the model (Copernican or the pre-Renaissance Tychonian/geocentric model) and watch the physics happen. Unfortunately, it doesn’t depict the degradation of orbits over time, nor does the sun explode when set a few billion years in the future. Still cool, though!

ageofreason:

The First 360 Degree View of the Sun